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Everything You Need to Know About Actos

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Some people have heard of the drug Actos, and some individuals in the United States use it. However, it is somewhat controversial. Many doctors have spoken out against it, while others still seem to support its use.

It’s worth knowing what Actos does, as well as the associated dangers. If your primary doctor does recommend that you use it, you’ll know something about it, and you can then make the best decision as to whether using it is worth it.

 

What is Actos?

Some people also refer to Actos by another name, pioglitazone. It’s a drug that the pharmaceutical company Takeda manufactures. You take it to treat Type 2 diabetes.

Takeda tested the drug before releasing it, but, like so many other medications, it’s hard to predict what it will do if a person takes it for a long time, like a period of months or years. The problem is that some studies link Actos to bladder cancer, and also diabetic macular edema, liver disease, and even heart failure.

Those are some pretty scary side effects, and many individuals who have used Actos are contacting lawyers to see about bringing individual or class-action lawsuits against the manufacturer.

 

What Do Other Countries Think About Actos?

If you go back to 2011, you’ll see that both France and Germany removed pioglitazone from the market. However, the FDA has not gone that far. They have issued a very strong warning against the drug, but they have not yanked it from the shelves yet.

Still, it’s evident that they are aware of the problems that it poses. The FDA did block Takeda Pharmaceuticals from putting aloglipitin on the market. That is one of their newest drugs, which does include pioglitazone in the formula.

 

What Else Can You Use to Treat Type 2 Diabetes?

There are more cases of adult Type 2 diabetes that doctors diagnose every year. Numbers keep rising because of certain genetic factors, but also because of sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy diets. The pandemic has not helped anything, as it has led many adults to exercise even less, with many gyms still closed.

If you want to treat Type 2 diabetes, changing your diet and exercising more can certainly help with that. Researchers are also studying the disease, and they are trying to come up with new ideas both to ward it off and to get people off of drugs like pioglitazone.

 

The Canadian Study

There’s an interesting Canadian Type 2 diabetes study that has led researchers in some new directions. It found that women who have little or even no control over their working conditions are more likely to develop the dangerous Type 2 diabetes condition than men.

The study pointed to micromanaging women as a stressor that could help lead to diabetes. It’s not clear why this happens, but some scientists theorize that a woman’s hormonal makeup might be a contributing factor.

If there’s a hormonal cause to Type 2 diabetes, that might lead to additional drug development down the line, perhaps even to gender-specific medications. The Canadian study seems to indicate that women, in particular, should avoid too many fat and sugar-containing comfort foods if they want to prevent Type 2 diabetes.

 

Detecting Glucose Levels

New human glucose-level detection methods should also help with trying to predict Type 2 diabetes. Scientists have now come out with sensors that use so-called nanoparticle rose petals. They can detect glucose levels in urine, saliva, and tears.

This is a less expensive testing system, and since it can utilize different fluids, it’s more practical than the widely-used blood test. With this device, doctors can detect early-onset Type 2 diabetes much better. 

They can warn the individual in question, and they can take steps to modify their eating habits and exercise routine. They can try to eliminate stressors as well.

 

What About Actos?

As for Actos, it remains legal and available for now. The FDA is still monitoring the situation, and some doctors no longer recommend it.

Still, it’s just another example of the medical community not agreeing about a drug’s efficacy. This sort of thing definitely happens more often than you might realize.

As someone with Type 2 diabetes, or if you are in a high-risk group, it’s tough knowing what to do if there’s no consensus about a drug. The best we can suggest is to talk to your doctor and to try and get as many facts as possible before starting or discontinuing an Actos regimen.


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