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 COVID-19: Which Sources Are Trustworthy? 

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If you go on social media, you’ll see a flurry of posts about the COVID-19 pandemic. To call the information you read on social media conflicting may win the award for the year’s biggest understatement. How can you know who you to trust?
Distrust in the media remains high in America, and the piecemeal pandemic approach hasn’t inspired renewed confidence. Plus, you must remember science is rarely exact, and as researchers add to their knowledge bases, new information may contradict the old. Here are some reliable sources you can trust.

1. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is  one of the major operating components of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Its primary mission is to protect Americans from health, safety and security threats at home and abroad. Part of its work involves developing a framework for handling contagious diseases.
A quick visit to its website reveals the organization’s official response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. You can read stories from first responders and learn how to use a face mask correctly. You’ll also find travel-related information if you previously planned a trip you can’t cancel that hasn’t been delayed due to restrictions.

2. Your State Health Department 

Your state health department is the best place to go for information on stay-at-home directives and where to obtain testing. Because the U.S. pandemic response rules depend on your region, you might want to bookmark this website. That’s where you’ll find the most up-to-date announcements on the rules.

3. Your Local City Hall

The United States has a unique governmental structure. Rather than flowing from the top down, you have multiple levels of governance with varying degrees of authority. Typically, directives trickle down from federal to state and local authorities.
However, when there’s a lack of direction from the top, individual mayors often must decide what is best for their communities. You can type your city into Google to find yours and call to find out if you must wear masks indoors.

4. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is yet another division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This organization handles investigation into medical research. Therefore, it’s the best place to go for the latest information about treatment guidelines and emerging vaccines.
You can also use this website to subscribe to COVID-19 updates and search for clinical trials. Some  regions now need volunteers to step up to the plate for science by participating in vaccine trials. If you are interested in participating, you can sign up through the NIH.

5. The World Health Organization (WHO)

Even though the Trump administration began a formal withdrawal from the World Health Organization (WHO), this is the most reliable international source for COVID-19 updates. Given the tenuous situation in the United States’ response to the pandemic, it’s vital to get an external perspective.
You can watch its most recent press conferences from its website. You’ll also find disease-prevention advice and scam alerts. If you want to donate to its valid COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund, you can do so there.

6. The National Health Service, U.K. (NHS)

The National Health Service (NHS) is a U.K.-funded medical and health care service that all citizens can use without paying the full cost. While residents across the pond can access the NHS to find a doctor or hospital, you can get updates about COVID-19 stateside. Since the site is in English, you won’t need an interpreter.

7. Your Family Physician 

Your family physician may not be a COVID-19 expert, but they know how to prevent infectious diseases. If you have questions you don’t trust the internet to answer, turn to them. They probably heard inquiries about mask-wearing and can advise you on the facts.

Get the Most Trustworthy Information on COVID-19

There is a ton of misinformation about the novel coronavirus. If you want the facts, the resources above will give you the most reliable science-based 411.
About The Author
Oscar Collins is the managing editor at Modded. He writes about cars, fitness, the outdoors and more. Follow @TModded on Twitter for more articles from the Modded team.

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